Our reading recommendations of the week #42 – 2017

Our reading recommendations of the week #42 – 2017

Here are our reading recommendations for this week.

October Testing Trapeze edition has been published and it’s one more time worth a read. You will find an article from Jennie Naylor giving advice about how to get earlier visibility into the quality of a solution delivered by your system integrators or third-party vendors. You can also read how drawing can help communicate your testing activities with Katrine Kavli and many other things.

Click here to download or open the pdf of this edition.

Then we suggest you to read this long article published in The Atlantic about the specificities of software and why this is maybe the hardest existing craft. Model-based design, which is unknown for most of programmers could (or should) be a good way to help have a good understanding of software systems. Programming has not much changed during the history, code is still code, and products driven by this code are still full of bugs. That’s one reason why Software is far from being dead. The Coming Software Apocalypse written by James Somers.

 

After that, we suggest you to read “On why and how I become a freelancer“. Bas Dijkstra explains the importance of working on his name and reputation, partly by writing interesting articles on blogs, and using social media to interact with other testers.

And one more time, Katrina Clokie gives great advices in order to help categorize everyone involved in Test automation with a very simple diagram how to identify where each team member fits the best and brings the most benefits, and find a strategy in order to improve the team roles. Please read “Identifying and influencing how people in your team contribute to test automation” published on her blog.

 

See you in 2 weeks for other readings!

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